Among the first signs of cognitive impairment in older adults is a decline in financial capacity, which is also a risk factor for abuse or exploitation. Banks and other financial institutions are at the front lines to monitor and detect changes in financial capacity and susceptibility to fraud and abuse. However, industry experts have found that, in many cases, no mechanism exists for financial service providers to communicate signs of cognitive impairment, abuse, or fraud to family, financial caregivers, or other financial institutions. Creating a regulatory environment whereby financial institutions can more easily share data among themselves could be an important component of a more comprehensive strategy to bridge the communication gap and reduce the frequency and severity of financial losses for older adults.