Consumer Credit & Payment Statistics

The Consumer Statistics page provides updated statistics related to consumer credit and consumer payments. The CFI compiles statistics that are relevant to researchers, reporters, and others interested in consumer credit and payments on a quarterly basis.

The statistics are divided into two sections:

1) Consumer Credit, which contains data on consumer debt, credit performance, and supply and demand of credit, and

2) Consumer Payments, which includes statistics on credit and debit cards and other noncash payments, as well as families’ revolving credit. There is a brief description of the data and a link to the source above the corresponding tables and graphs.

Consumer Credit Snapshot

This snapshot contains data on consumer debt, credit performance, and supply and demand of credit.

Consumer Debt

Aggregate Indebtedness of Consumers

Total consumer credit outstanding is divided into two categories in the G.19 report: revolving and nonrevolving credit. The G.19, a Federal Reserve report covering consumer credit, is released around the fifth business day of each month. The report contains statistics for the amounts of outstanding credit among several major holders of consumer credit. Also included are the terms of credit across a variety of institutions and types of loans.

Access at www.federalreserve.gov/releases/g19/current/

This table is current as of July 2018.

Consumer Credit (G.19)
(EOP, SA, $Bil)
2007
2010
2013
2014
2015
2016
Q1:17
Q2:17
Q3:17
Total Outstanding
$2,609.48
$2,646.88
$3,095.56
$3,317.45
$3,417.16
$3,645.24
$3,692.90
$3,736.07
$3,778.74
Revolving
$1,001.63
$839.10
$857.06
$891.07
$909.58
$969.63
$979.87
$991.89
$1,003.22
Nonrevolving
$1,607.85
$1,807.71
$2,238.50
$2,426.38
$2,507.57
$2,675.60
$2,713.03
$2,744.18
$2,775.52
Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System G.19 Credit Report
Notes: Consumer credit covers most short- and intermediate-term credit extended to individuals. It includes revolving credit (credit card credit and balances outstanding on unsecured revolving lines of credit) and nonrevolving credit (such as secured and unsecured credit for automobiles, mobile homes, trailers, durable goods, vacations, and other purposes). Consumer credit excludes loans secured by real estate (such as mortgage loans, home equity loans, and home equity lines of credit).
EOP = end of period, SA = seasonally adjusted

Consumer Credit (G.19)

Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System G.19 Credit Report
Consumer Debt Composition

The data used to show consumer debt composition come from two subsections of the Federal Reserve Financial Accounts of the United States (Z.1). These subsections (Tables D.1 and D.3) measure debt growth and debt outstanding in several sectors. The Federal Reserve Board of Governors releases these statistics during the second week of March, June, September, and December.

Access at www.federalreserve.gov/releases/z1/ ; see the current release under "Debt growth, borrowing, and debt outstanding tables."

This table is current as of July 2018.

Consumer Debt Composition and Growth
 
2007
2010
2013
2014
2015
2016
Q1:17
Q2:17
Q3:17
Debt Outstanding (SA, $Bil)
Credit Market
$14,175.50
$13,576.17
$13,597.50
$13,954.63
$14,218.10
$14,673.90
$14,802.46
$14,935.97
$15,067.46
Home Mortgages
$10,638.00
$9,985.32
$9,474.65
$9,455.83
$9,586.01
$9,796.09
$9,881.83
$9,947.57
$1,009.87
Consumer Credit
$2,609.47
$2,646.81
$3,095.56
$3,317.45
$3,417.16
$3,645.24
$3,692.90
$3,736.07
$3,781.69
Growth Rate (SAAR, %)
Credit Market
7.0
-0.4
1.8
2.9
2.9
3.6
3.6
3.8
3.7
Home Mortgages
7.2
-1.6
0.1
0.3
1.5
2.5
3.8
3.0
2.8
Consumer Credit
6.0
-1.1
5.9
7.0
6.9
6.5
5.2
4.7
4.9
Notes: Home mortgages and consumer credit will not add up to total household debt because the other four components are unpublished. The four unpublished components are municipal securities, bank loans not elsewhere classified, other loans and advances, and commercial mortgages.
SA = seasonally adjusted, SAAR = seasonally adjusted annual rate
Data are on an end-of-period basis and may differ from monthly average statistics in the Board’s H.6 release.

Debt Composition and Growth

National, State, and Regional Data on Consumer Debt

The Consumer Credit Explorer (CCE) is an interactive tool for examining trends in consumer credit use at the regional, state, and national levels. The CCE enables users to look at quarterly changes in credit use indicators from 2005 to mid-2017 and to compare indicators across different areas. Users can analyze overall credit access, median debt levels, and delinquency rates for a variety of credit types (e.g., auto loans, student loans, mortgages, credit cards). Also, users can choose to focus specifically on consumers in low- and moderate-income neighborhoods, nonprime consumers, and consumers in different age categories.

Access at www.philadelphiafed.org/cce

Holders of Consumer Debt

The data that show the level of consumer debt held by several sectors come from two subsections of the Federal Reserve Financial Accounts of the United States (Z.1). These subsections (Tables L.218 and L.222) measure the outstandings of home mortgages and consumer credit held as assets by government and nongovernment institutions. The Federal Reserve Board of Governors releases these statistics during the second weeks of March, June, September, and December.

Access at www.federalreserve.gov/releases/z1/; see under "Level tables."

This table is current as of January 2018.

Holders of Nonmortgage Consumer Debt
(NSA, $Bil)
2007
2010
2013
2014
2015
2016
Q1:17
Q2:17
Q3:17
Federal Government1
Consumer Credit
$115.66
$363.78
$735.52
$835.56
$949.67
$1,049.29
$1,087.04
$1,098.28
$1,136.53
Home Mortgage2
$13.67
$23.88
$25.61
$26.79
$28.42
$29.91
$28.96
$29.47
$29.13
U.S.-Chartered Depository Institutions
Consumer Credit
$894.88
$1,185.51
$1,271.57
$1,343.11
$1,428.33
$1,532.09
$1,487.07
$1,514.30
$1,541.42
Home Mortgage2
$3,068.86
$2,615.61
$2,385.66
$2,390.45
$2,433.86
$2,509.91
$2,491.24
$2,525.55
$2,545.14
Credit Unions
Consumer Credit
$236.57
$226.47
$265.56
$302.78
$342.32
$380.28
$386.90
$404.27
$417.20
Home Mortgage2
$280.21
$316.96
$345.89
$372.47
$404.87
$439.41
$447.32
$456.14
$470.61
Government-Sponsored Enterprises3
Home Mortgage2
$447.86
$4,690.72
$4,546.39
$4,538.05
$4,570.99
$4,644.78
$4,687.81
$4,702.76
$4,735.11
Issuers of Asset-Backed Securities4
Consumer Credit
$652.51
$50.34
$49.15
$49.79
$46.01
$50.01
$56.04
$56.45
$52.73
Home Mortgage2
$2,234.07
$1,315.24
$792.60
$699.61
$602.61
$522.21
$510.46
$496.66
$480.44
Finance Companies
Consumer Credit
$577.89
$704.99
$679.14
$684.10
$561.33
$547.90
$541.86
$542.70
$540.22
Home Mortgage2
$493.66
$169.53
$114.73
$104.62
$123.43
$106.78
$104.92
$100.53
$99.04
Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Financial Accounts of the United States (Z.1)
Notes: NSA = not seasonally adjusted
1 “Federal Government” includes loans originated by the U.S. Department of Education under the Federal Direct Loan Program, as well as Federal Family Education Loan Program loans that the government purchased from depository institutions and finance companies.
2 Mortgages on one- to four-family properties; this applies to home mortgages in all categories.
3 This sector includes Federal Home Loan Banks (FHLB), Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, Sallie Mae, Farm Credit System, the Financing Corporation, and Resolution Funding Corporation (REFCORP).
4 This includes special-purpose vehicles established contractually to hold assets and issue debt obligations backed by the assets. These assets have been transferred off the balance sheet of the institution that originated the loan to the special-purpose vehicles.

Holders of Consumer Debt: Non-Mortgage Consumer Credit

Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Financial Accounts of the United States (Z.1)

Holders of Consumer Debt: Mortgage Consumer Credit

Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Financial Accounts of the United States (Z.1)

Credit Performance

Loan Charge-Offs

The charge-off statistics released by the Federal Reserve Board are calculated from data available in the Report of Condition and Income (Call Report), which is filed each quarter by all commercial banks. Charge-off rates for any category of loan are defined as the flow of a bank's net charge-offs (gross charge-offs minus recoveries) during a quarter, divided by the average level of its loans outstanding over that quarter. Data for each calendar quarter become available approximately 60 days after the end of the quarter.

Access at www.federalreserve.gov/releases/chargeoff/
Note: Net charge-offs can only be accessed using the Data Download Program (DDP) tool on the website.

Loan Charge-Offs
 
2007
2010
2013
2014
2015
2016
Q1:17
Q2:17
Q3:17
Charge-Off Rate1 (SAAR, %)
Consumer Loans
2.48
5.89
2.16
1.93
1.75
1.91
2.18
2.13
2.23
Credit Cards
3.99
9.41
3.48
3.16
2.93
3.15
3.46
3.55
3.57
Residential Real Estate Loans2
0.26
2.11
0.66
0.29
0.21
0.10
0.06
0.04
0.04
Net Charge-Offs3 (NSA, $Mil)
Consumer Loans
$21,820
$74,350
$26,267
$24,058
$22,706
$26,313
$8,035
$7,444
$7,471
Credit Cards
$13,254
$61,886
$21,039
$19,135
$18,116
$20,728
$6,056
$6,126
$5,829
Residential Real Estate Loans2
$5,036
$44,281
$13,383
$5,847
$4,224
$2,116
$373
$173
$214
Sources: Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council; FRB Call Report; Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
Notes: SAAR = seasonally adjusted annual rate, NSA = not seasonally adjusted
Annual data are aggregated by averaging quarterly values.
1 The charge-off rate is the flow of a bank’s net charge-offs (gross charge-offs minus recoveries) during a quarter divided by the average level of its loans outstanding over that quarter multiplied by 400 to express the ratio as an annual percentage rate. Charge-off loans are reported on schedule RI-B and the average levels of loans on schedule RC-K.
2 Residential real estate loans include loans secured by one- to four-family properties, including home equity lines of credit.
3 Charge-offs are the value of loans and leases removed from the books and charged against loss reserves.

Loan Charge-Off Rate

Sources: Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council; FRB Call Report; Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System

Loan Charge-Offs

Sources: Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council; FRB Call Report; Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
Note: Quarters are annualized to reflect how much change will occur over a year’s time if charge-offs continue to grow at the current quarter’s growth rate.

Quarterly Loan Charge-Offs

Sources: Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council; FRB Call Report; Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
Loan Delinquencies

The delinquency statistics presented on the Federal Reserve Board's website are calculated from data available in the Report of Condition and Income (Call Report), which is filed each quarter by all commercial banks. The delinquency rate for any loan category is the ratio of the dollar amount of a bank's delinquent loans in that category to the dollar amount of total loans outstanding in that category. Data for each calendar quarter become available approximately 60 days after the end of the quarter.

Access at www.federalreserve.gov/releases/chargeoff/
Note: Delinquencies can only be accessed using the DDP tool on the website

Loan Delinquencies
 
2007
2010
2013
2014
2015
2016
Q1:17
Q2:17
Q3:17
Delinquency Rate1 (SAAR, %)
Consumer Loans
3.40
3.63
2.37
2.09
2.01
2.16
2.18
2.21
2.27
Credit Cards
4.59
4.12
2.38
2.15
2.15
2.36
2.42
2.48
2.53
Residential Real Estate Loans2
3.08
10.37
8.32
6.53
5.08
4.14
3.91
3.70
3.62
Delinquencies3 (NSA, EOP, $ Mil)
Consumer Loans
$33,766
$46,075
$31,084
$28,608
$26,066
$33,222
$29,553
$29,930
$33,394
Credit Cards
$17,376
$27,489
$15,162
$14,098
$14,753
$17,223
$16,108
$16,083
$17,965
Residential Real Estate Loans2
$65,956
$220,410
$169,270
$135,909
$109,828
$90,999
$82,950
$77,510
$78,820
Sources: Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council; FRB Call Report; Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
Notes: NSA = not seasonally adjusted, EOP = end of period
Yearly figures take fourth quarter values.
1Delinquency Rate” is the delinquent loan/lease as a percent of end-of-period loan/lease balance.
2 Residential real estate loans include loans secured by one- to four-family properties, including home equity lines of credit.
3 Delinquent loans include those past due 30 days or more and still accruing interest, as well as those on nonaccrual status.

Loan Delinquency Rate

Sources: Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council; FRB Call Report; Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System

Loan Delinquencies

Sources: Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council; FRB Call Report; Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
Bankruptcy

The statistics used to measure bankruptcy filings come from the Administrative Office of the United States Courts. Included are bankruptcy filings by both business and nonbusiness entities. Note that the surge of bankruptcies in 2005 was due to the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act (BAPCPA), which took effect on October 17, 2005. All entries in the table are annual figures except for the columns that reference specific quarters.

Access at http://www.uscourts.gov/report-name/bankruptcy-filings

Bankruptcy Filings
 
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
Q1:17
Q2:17
Q3:17
Total
849,412
1,115,813
1,472,238
1,592,669
1,410,918
1,221,091
1,071,589
935,898
844,495
794,960
201,231
210,342
194,830
Nonbusiness
821,275
1,072,952
1,411,708
1,536,623
1,363,015
1,181,016
1,038,528
909,049
819,760
770,846
195,516
203,976
189,540
Source: Administrative Office of the United States Courts
Note: All annual entries in the table include revisions, whereas the quarterly series do not.

U.S. Nonbusiness Bankruptcy Filings

Source: Administrative Office of the United States Courts
Note: The quarterly figures are not annualized.

Credit Standards and the Demand for Credit

The data used to describe banks’ credit standards and demand for consumer loans come from two questions asked by the Senior Loan Officer Opinion Survey (SLOOS). This survey covers approximately 60 large domestic banks. The Federal Reserve generally conducts the survey quarterly, timing it so that results are available for the January/February, April/May, August, and October/November meetings of the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC). Questions cover changes in the standards and terms of the banks’ lending and the state of business and household demand for loans, or occasionally, specific topics of current interest. Notably, the SLOOS was updated in 2011 and revised as to how it asked respondents about changes in demand for consumer credit. Currently, the survey captures demand for consumer credit with multiple questions, whereas from 1998 to 2010, this information was gathered with one question. This survey methodology delineation is marked on the following graph.

Access at www.federalreserve.gov/boarddocs/snloansurvey/

Banks Tightening Standards on New Cards (NSA)

Source: Senior Loan Officer Opinion Survey, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
Note: The height of the line in the graph above is the net percentage of banks tightening credit standards for new credit card applicants.

Banks Experiencing Increasing Demand for Consumer Loans (NSA)

Source: Senior Loan Officer Opinion Survey, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
Notes:
The height of the line in the graph above is the net percentage of banks with strengthening demand for consumer loans. The black vertical line represents the cutoff between the two survey methodologies.

National, State, and Regional Data on Mortgage Applications

The Home Mortgage Explorer draws from publicly available Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA) data and enables users to explore trends in residential mortgage lending for national, state, metropolitan, and nonmetropolitan geographies. The Explorer includes information on the number of originated mortgages, application denial rates, and the reasons given by lenders for denying applications. Trends can be examined by loan type (e.g., conventional, Federal Housing Administration) and loan purpose (e.g., home purchase, refinance), and all measures are provided by applicant and neighborhood income.

Access at www.philadelphiafed.org/hme

Credit at the Family Level

The data used to describe the revolving credit of families come from the Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF). The SCF is a triennial survey of the balance sheet, pension, income, and other demographic characteristics of U.S. families. The survey also gathers information on the use of financial institutions.

Access at www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/oss/oss2/scfindex.html

Percentage of Families with a Transaction Account (%)
 
1995
1998
2001
2004
2007
2010
2013
2016
All Families
87.4
90.6
91.4
91.3
92.1
92.5
93.2
98.0
Income Percentile
Less than 20%
63.2
68.8
71.6
75.5
74.9
76.2
79.1
94.2
20–39.9%
85.2
90.3
90.3
87.3
90.1
91.1
90.7
96.3
40–59.9%
92.0
95.4
96.6
95.9
96.3
96.4
97.2
99.4
60–79.9%
97.3
98.9
99.1
98.4
99.3
98.9
99.1
99.9
80–89.9%
98.7
99.6
99.7
99.1
100.0
99.8
99.8
99.8
90–100%
99.8
100.0
99.2
100.0
100.0
99.9
100.0
100.0
Age of Family Head
35 or younger
80.9
84.7
87.1
86.4
87.3
89.0
90.2
97.7
35–44
87.6
90.5
91.1
90.8
91.2
90.6
91.8
97.3
45–54
89.2
94.1
92.7
91.8
91.7
92.5
91.8
98.5
55–64
88.8
93.9
93.8
93.2
96.4
94.2
94.6
98.0
65–74
91.7
94.1
93.8
93.9
94.6
95.8
97.1
98.6
75 or older
93.2
90.0
93.7
96.4
95.3
96.4
96.7
97.8
Housing Status
Homeowner
95.3
96.4
96.7
96.0
97.3
97.4
97.5
99.0
Renter or not homeowner
72.9
79.4
80.3
80.9
80.8
82.4
85.2
96.2
Median Balance of Transaction Accounts for Families with Holdings (2016 $)
 
1995
1998
2001
2004
2007
2010
2013
2016
All Families
3.3
4.5
5.4
4.8
4.6
3.9
4.2
4.5
Income Percentile
Less than 20%
1,100
1,000
1,200
800
900
700
600
600
20–39.9%
2,000
2,200
2,400
1,900
1,900
1,700
1,400
1,700
40–59.9%
2,400
3,300
3,800
3,800
3,200
3,100
3,100
3,800
60–79.9%
3,800
6,300
7,000
8,300
6,900
5,900
7,000
8,200
80–89.9%
6,500
11,100
12,800
14,000
14,900
12,300
13,900
18,700
90–100%
20,800
26,600
35,200
35,600
42,500
38,700
52,600
62,000
Age of Family Head
35 or younger
1,900
2,200
2,400
2,300
2,800
2,300
2,300
2,600
35–44
3,100
4,200
4,600
3,800
4,000
2,800
3,900
3,800
45–54
4,700
6,500
6,200
6,100
5,800
3,900
4,100
4,100
55–64
4,900
6,000
7,500
8,500
6,000
5,600
5,200
5,400
65–74
5,100
8,300
10,800
7,000
8,900
6,300
7,200
8,000
75 or older
7,800
8,900
9,900
8,200
7,100
8,000
7,200
10,000
Housing Status
Homeowner
4,700
7,200
7,900
7,600
7,200
6,400
7,300
9,000
Renter or not homeowner
1,800
1,600
1,600
1,400
1,400
1,100
1,200
1,200

Credit Card Balance of Families by Income Percentile in 2007

Percentage of Families with a Credit Card Balance (%)
 
1995
1998
2001
2004
2007
2010
2013
2016
All Families
47.3
44.1
44.4
46.2
46.1
39.4
38.1
43.9
Income Percentile
Less than 20%
26.0
24.5
30.3
28.8
25.7
23.2
19.6
29.0
20–39.9%
43.2
40.9
44.5
42.9
39.5
33.4
34.2
41.7
40–59.9%
52.9
50.1
52.8
55.1
54.8
45.0
46.9
53.0
60–79.9%
60.0
57.4
52.6
56.1
62.1
53.1
49.8
52.8
80–89.9%
61.0
53.1
50.3
57.6
55.8
51.0
48.2
51.5
90–100%
47.3
42.1
33.1
38.5
40.6
33.6
32.2
34.4
Age of Family Head
35 or younger
54.7
50.7
49.6
47.5
48.5
38.7
36.8
45.4
35–44
55.9
51.3
54.1
58.8
51.7
45.6
41.7
49.1
45–54
56.4
52.5
50.4
54.0
53.6
46.2
44.3
52.3
55–64
43.2
45.7
41.6
42.1
49.9
41.3
43.4
41.4
65–74
30.5
29.2
30.0
31.9
37.0
31.9
32.8
42.1
75 or older
17.5
11.2
18.4
23.5
18.8
21.7
21.1
26.2
Housing Status
Homeowner
51.1
46.2
44.4
48.8
50.1
43.1
42.0
46.4
Renter or not homeowner
40.3
40.0
44.3
40.4
37.3
31.8
30.9
39.5
Median Value of Credit Card Balances for Families with Holdings (2016 $)
 
1995
1998
2001
2004
2007
2010
2013
2016
All Families
4,700
6,100
5,600
6,500
8,500
7,800
5,900
5,700
Income Percentile
Less than 20%
1,100
1,400
1,400
1,300
1,200
1,100
1,000
800
20–39.9%
1,900
1,800
1,700
2,400
2,100
1,700
1,400
1,800
40–59.9%
2,300
2,800
2,700
2,700
2,800
2,400
2,200
2,000
60–79.9%
2,400
3,200
3,100
3,800
4,600
3,400
3,100
3,100
80–89.9%
3,100
3,000
5,100
3,400
6,400
6,500
4,600
4,800
90–100%
4,400
4,400
3,800
5,100
8,700
8,800
4,100
6,000
Age of Family Head
35 or younger
2,000
2,200
2,700
1,900
2,100
1,800
1,500
1,400
35–44
3,000
3,000
2,700
3,200
4,100
3,900
2,600
2,500
45–54
3,100
2,700
3,100
3,700
4,200
3,900
2,700
2,800
55–64
2,000
3,000
2,600
2,800
4,200
3,100
3,100
2,800
65–74
1,300
1,600
1,300
2,800
3,500
2,400
2,400
2,500
75 or older
500
1,000
1,000
1,300
900
2,000
2,000
2,100
Housing Status
Homeowner
2,300
3,000
2,800
3,200
4,200
3,800
2,900
3,000
Renter or not homeowner
1,500
1,900
1,600
1,900
1,500
1,400
1,500
1,300

Credit Card Balance of Families by Income Percentile in 2007

Maps of Local Credit Quality

The Federal Reserve Bank of New York publishes regional information on consumer credit conditions.

https://www.newyorkfed.org/data-and-statistics/data-visualization/community-credit-profiles/index.html

Consumer Payments Snapshot

This snapshot includes statistics on credit and debit cards and other noncash payments as well as households’ revolving credit.

U.S. Currency

The data showing the value of banknotes and coins issued in the U.S. comes from a report released by The Bank for International Settlements’ Committee on Payments and Market Infrastructures (CPMI). The report, Statistics on Payment, Clearing and Settlement Systems in the CPMI Countries, is published annually.

Access at https://www.bis.org/cpmi/publ/d172.pdf

Banknotes and Coins Issued ($BIL)
(EOP, SA, $Bil)
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
Banknotes Issued
$1,127.10
$1,198.35
$1,299.14
$1,379.96
$1,463.36
USD 100
$863.07
$924.71
$1,014.50
$1,082.24
$1,154.77
USD 50
$72.52
$74.48
$76.93
$79.81
$83.49
USD 20
$148.95
$155.00
$162.17
$171.28
$177.24
USD 10
$17.75
$18.46
$18.89
$18.95
$19.24
USD 5
$12.22
$12.70
$13.12
$13.71
$14.22
USD 1
$10.30
$10.61
$11.04
$11.39
$11.74
Other
$2.30
$2.40
$2.49
$2.58
$2.66
Coin Issued
$42.03
$42.82
$43.74
$44.97
$45.97
USD 1
$4.93
$5.02
$5.08
$5.17
$5.24
Fractional Coins
$37.10
$37.80
$38.66
$39.79
$40.74
Total Banknotes and Coin Issued
$1,169.13
$1,241.16
$1,342.88
$1,424.93
$1,509.34
Banknotes and Coin Held by Banks
$79.13
$81.36
$88.78
$84.53
$86.94
Banknotes and Coin in Circulation Outside Banks
$1,090.00
$1,159.80
$1,254.10
$1,340.40
$1,422.40
Source: Federal Reserve; U.S. Treasury

Noncash Payments

The data used to describe noncash payments come from the 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016 editions of the Federal Reserve Payments Study, a triennial survey of the payments industry first conducted in 2001. These studies are part of a Federal Reserve System effort to track noncash payments in the United States, and they reflect the efforts of hundreds of organizations across the country.

Access at https://www.federalreserve.gov/paymentsystems/fr-payments-study.htm

Noncash Payments
 
20033
2006
20093
20124
20151
Volume
(Bil)
Value
($Tril)
Volume
(Bil)
Value
($Tril)
Volume
(Bil)
Value
($Tril)
Volume
(Bil)
Value
($Tril)
Volume
(Bil)
Value
($Tril)
Total Noncash Payments
81.40
$67.58
95.20
$75.70
108.10
$72.17
122.40
$174.44
144.10
$177.85
Checks (Paid)1
37.30
$41.15
30.50
$41.60
24.50
$31.60
18.30
$25.85
17.30
$28.80
Debit Card
15.60
$0.63
25.00
$1.00
37.50
$1.40
47.00
$1.82
59.60
$2.29
Signature
10.30
$0.40
15.70
$0.60
23.10
$0.80
22.20
$0.65
31.20
$0.98
PIN
5.30
$0.20
9.40
$0.40
14.40
$0.60
16.90
$0.69
20.70
$0.82
Prepaid Card2
0.80
$0.02
3.30
$0.08
5.90
$0.14
9.20
$0.22
9.90
$0.30
EBT
0.80
$0.02
1.10
$0.03
2.00
$0.05
2.50
$0.07
2.60
$0.08
Credit Card
19.00
$1.68
21.70
$2.10
21.00
$1.87
26.20
$2.48
33.80
$3.08
ACH
8.80
$24.11
14.60
$31.00
19.10
$37.16
21.70
$144.08
23.50
$145.30
*additional debit card fields are included therefore signature and pin do not sum to total
Sources: 2016, 2013, 2010, and 2007 Federal Reserve Payments Study
Data from 2015 are preliminary and subject to adjustments. Further detail will be available in 2017.
The nominal values of checks (paid) increased (displayed in the table). However, in constant dollars, the value of checks (paid) showed a growth rate of -2.5 percent per year.
2 Revisions made to the 2007 and 2010 studies recategorized prepaid cards so as not to include them with debit card estimates.
3 The 2003 and 2009 values are updated to include new information from the 2013 study.
4 The 2013 Federal Reserve Payments Study ACH payments include “on-us” payments previously believed to be offset entries. As a result, the values reported for the volume and value of ACH and total noncash payments are not comparable with earlier years.

Noncash Payments Volume (Bil)

Noncash Payments Volume (Bil)

Noncash Payments Value (Tril)

Noncash Payments Value ($ Tril)

Comparing Consumers' Use with Business’ Use of Noncash Payments

A new dataset available in the 2016 Federal Reserve Payments Study is a contrast of consumers' use with businesses' use of noncash payment instruments.

Use of Noncash Payments
Consumer vs. Business 2015
 
Consumer
Business
Debit
0.58
0.09
Credit
0.25
0.21
Check
0.08
0.33
ACH Network Debit
0.09
0.04
ACH Network Credit
<0.01
0.33
Note: Some small business payments could have been identified as consumer payments.
Totals may not equal 100% because of rounding.

Consumer Payers vs. Business Payers

Source: 2016 Federal Reserve Payments Study: “Exploring Trends in Noncash Payments in the United States,” presented at NACHA Payments Conference 2017

Unauthorized Transactions

The 2015 and 2016 data used to describe unauthorized transactions come from the Federal Reserve Payments Study: 2017 Annual Supplement. This annual supplementary data collection is conducted to keep information current between the triennial Federal Reserve Payments Study (FRPS). An unauthorized transaction is a transaction made or attempted by an individual who is not authorized by the accountholder or cardholder to use a payment instrument (e.g., ACH, check, credit card, or debit/ATM card) to purchase goods and services, initiate funds transfers, or withdraw cash from an ATM.

Access at https://www.federalreserve.gov/paymentsystems/fr-payments-study.htm

Distribution of Card Fraud Types for the U.S. and Selected Countries (%)
Fraud Type 2015
U.S.
Australia
Canada
France
United Kingdom
Counterfeit card
44
4
8
0
8
Lost or stolen card
11
10
5
32
13
Card issued but not received
1
4
1
1
2
Fraudulent application
3
0
3
n/a
2
Fraudulent use of account number
39
81
81
67
70
Other
2
1
3
1
4
Sources: 2016 Federal Reserve Payments Study – initial data release
Note: More data will be available later in 2017.


Distribution of general-purpose card fraud, by value, 2015 and 2016 (Percent)
Fraud Type
2015
2016
Change
Total Fraud
100.0
100.0
0.0
Counterfeit card
43.7
36.0
-7.7
Lost or stolen card
10.8
11.2
0.4
Card issued but not received
0.7
0.8
0.1
Fraudulent application
3.2
5.2
2.0
Fraudulent use of account number
39.2
44.2
5.1
Other
2.4
2.6
0.2
Total Fraud
100.0
100.0
0.0
Channels
In person
53.8
41.5
-12.3
Remote
46.2
58.5
12.3
Source: Federal Reserve Payments Study: 2017 Annual Supplement
Note: Figures may not sum because of rounding. The 2015 percentages are restated.


Unauthorized Transactions in 2012
Instrument/Method
Number
Value
Unauthorized
(Mil)
Total
(Bil)
Rate
(Bps)
Unauthorized
($Bil)
Total
($Tril)
Rate
(Bps)
All Fraud Types
32.3
119.7
2.70
$6.4
$174.7
0.37
All GP Cards
29.8
79.7
3.74
$4.1
$4.8
8.43
GP credit card
13.7
23.8
5.74
$2.3
$2.2
10.23
Card-present
7.1
18.0
3.92
$1.1
$1.2
9.15
Card-not-present
6.6
5.8
11.44
$1.1
$1.0
11.58
GP debit, prepaid, and ATM
16.1
55.9
2.89
$1.8
$2.6
6.91
GP debit and prepaid
14.9
50.1
2.97
$1.5
$1.9
8.04
Signature
14.0
32.2
4.36
$1.4
$1.2
11.91
Card-present
8.0
26.2
3.07
$1.0
$0.8
12.45
Card-not-present
6.0
5.9
10.10
$0.5
$0.4
10.90
PIN
0.8
17.9
0.47
$0.1
$0.7
1.70
ATM withdrawals
1.3
5.8
2.21
$0.3
$0.7
3.74
ACH
1.7
21.7
0.77
$1.2
$144.1
0.09
ACH credits
0.5
8.8
0.59
$0.4
$77.4
0.05
ACH debits
1.2
12.9
0.89
$0.8
$66.7
0.13
Check
0.9
18.3
0.47
$1.1
$25.9
0.43
Source: 2013 Federal Reserve Payments Study
Figures may not add up to 100 percent because of rounding.
GP denotes general purpose.
Bps denotes basis points; these are the number of unauthorized transactions per 10,000 transactions or the value of unauthorized transactions per $10,000 spent. One hundred basis points equal 1 percent.
Note: More data will be available later in 2017.

 Unauthorized Transactions in 2012

Source: 2013 Federal Reserve Payments Study
GP denotes general purpose.
Note: More data will be available later in 2017.
Average Values of Unauthorized Transactions in 2012 ($)
GP Credit Card
GP Debit Card
ATM Withdrawals
ACH
Check
$136
$104
$199
$736
$1,272
Source: 2013 Federal Reserve Payments Study
GP denotes general purpose.
Debit card includes prepaid cards.

Rate of Third-party fraud in 2012

Source: 2013 Federal Reserve Payments Study
Basis points are the number of unauthorized transactions per 10,000 transactions or the value of unauthorized transactions per $10,000 spent. One hundred basis points equal 1 percent.

Rate of Unauthorized General-Purpose Card Transactions in 2012

Source: 2013 Federal Reserve Payments Study
GP denotes general purpose.
Basis points are the number of unauthorized transactions per 10,000 transactions or the value of unauthorized transactions per $10,000 spent. One hundred basis points equal 1 percent.
The variation between types of payment instrument is represented by color, while the variation between type of payment initiation is represented by shape. The 45-degree line is a collection of points for which the rate of volume and the rate of value are equal in terms of basis points.
Note: More data will be available later in 2017
Untitled Document

Checks

The data used to describe checks come from the 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016 Federal Reserve Payments Study. Also used to describe checks are data from the 2016 Federal Reserve Check Sample Study, a triennial survey of the payments industry first conducted in 2001. These studies are part of a Federal Reserve System effort to track noncash payments in the United States, and they reflect the activities of financial institutions, networks, and other providers of payment services across the country. The 2016 Depository Institutions Payment Study is a random sample of depository institutions that collects the number and value of different types of payments and contributes to the estimates of total checks written. The 2016 Check Sample Study is a random sample of checks processed by 11 large commercial banks used to estimate the distribution of checks among various counterparties. “On-us” are  transactions in which the bank that issues your card is the same as the one which owns the ATM or POS terminal on which you made the transaction.

Access at https://www.federalreserve.gov/paymentsystems/fr-payments-study.htm


Check Payments*
  2012 2015 2016
 
Volume
(Bil)
Value
($Tril)
Volume
(Bil)
Value
($Tril)
Volume
(Bil)
Value
($Tril)
Interbank
14.1
$17.44
13.3
$20.92
12.8
$20.13
On-Us
5.6
$9.77
4.3
$7.88
4.1
$7.62
Source: Federal Reserve Payments Study: 2017 Annual Supplement
2016 figures are imputed from 2015-2016 difference estimates
2016 estimates were derived from data from just 80 large depository institutions, <7% of the number of institutions that provided data for the 2015 triennial study. Therefore the rates reported may serve as indicators but are less reliable than the full, representative sample.
*Excludes checks converted to ACH


Checks Paid by Type of Depository Institution
 
20031
2006
20091
2012
Number
(Bil)
Value
($Tril)
Number
(Bil)
Value
($Tril)
Number
(Bil)
Value
($Tril)
Number
(Bil)
Value
($Tril)
Total
37.3
$41.2
30.5
$41.6
24.5
$31.6
18.3
$25.9
Commercial Banks
29.7
$38.4
25.0
$39.0
20.7
$29.2
15.8
$24.0
Credit Unions
4.2
$0.9
2.8
$0.8
2.1
$0.7
1.5
$0.7
Savings Institutions
3.0
$1.5
2.3
$1.6
1.3
$1.3
0.8
$1.0
Sources: The 2007, 2010, and 2013 Federal Reserve Payments Study
1 The 2003 and 2009 values are updated to include new information from the 2013 study.

Check Volume and Value

Note: More data will be available later in 2017
Distribution of Checks by Dollar Amount in 2015
Dollar Amount Range
Distribution
$0.01–$50
26%
$50.01–$100
15%
$100.01–$500
34%
$500.01–$1,000
11%
$1,000.01–$2,500
8%
$2,500.01–$5,000
3%
$5,000.01 +
4%
Source: 2015 Federal Reserve Payments Study

Distribution of Checks by Dollar Amount in 2015

Distribution of the Number of Checks by Counterparty
Counterparty
2006
2009
2012
2015
C2B
51.4%
10.5%
44.9%
45.5%
C2C
6.6%
22.1%
10.6%
9.4%
B2B
25.1%
14.4%
28.7%
17.8%
B2C
16.8%
19.0%
16.0%
27.3%
Source: 2015 Federal Reserve Payments Study
Figures may not sum because of rounding.
Definitions:
C2B: Consumer-to-Business
C2C: Consumer-to-Consumer
B2B: Business-to-Business
B2C: Business-to-Consumer
Distribution of the Value of Checks by Counterparty in 2015
Counterparty
Distribution
C2B
15.6%
C2C
3.7%
B2B
67.3%
B2C
13.3%
Source: 2015 Federal Reserve Payments Study
Figures may not sum because of rounding.
Definitions:
C2B: Consumer-to-Business
C2C: Consumer-to-Consumer
B2B: Business-to-Business
B2C: Business-to-Consumer

Credit Cards

The data used to describe credit cards come from the 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016 Federal Reserve Payments Study. Also used to describe credit cards are data from The Nilson Report, a twice-monthly newsletter from a firm in Carpinteria, CA. These studies are part of a Federal Reserve System effort to track noncash payments in the United States, and they reflect the efforts of hundreds of organizations across the country. The statistics for the number of cards and cardholders are from The Nilson Report. The values for years prior to 2008 are as reported in the Statistical Abstract of the United States. The more recent values were obtained directly from The Nilson Report.

Access at

Distribution of General-Purpose Credit Card Payments in 2015
 
Volume (Bil)
% of Total
Value ($Bil)
% of Total
<$5
3.3
10.5%
0.01
0.3%
$5 ‒ 14.99
6.8
22.1%
0.06
2.3%
$15 ‒ 24.99
4.5
14.4%
0.09
3.1%
$25+
16.5
53.1%
2.64
94.3%
Source: 2015 Federal Reserve Payments Study
Credit Card Volume, Value, and Average Value
 
20031
2006
20091
2012
2015
Volume
(Bil)
Value
($Tril)
Avg.
Value ($)
Volume
(Bil)
Value
($Tril)
Avg.
Value ($)
Volume
(Bil)
Value
($Tril)
Avg.
Value ($)
Volume
(Bil)
Value
($Tril)
Avg.
Value ($)
Volume
(Bil)
Value
($Tril)
Avg.
Value ($)
Total
19.0
$1.7
$89
21.7
$2.1
$98
21.0
$1.9
$89
26.2
$2.5
$96
32.8
$3.03
$109.50
General Purpose
15.2
$1.4
$93
19.0
$1.9
$99
19.5
$1.7
$87
23.8
$2.2
$93
30.0
$2.68
$90.00
Private Label
3.8
$0.3
$72
2.8
$0.3
$92
1.5
$0.2
$119
2.4
$0.3
$111
2.7
$0.35
$129.00
Source: Triennial Federal Reserve Payments Studies
1 The 2003 and 2009 values are updated to include new information from the 2013 study.
Figures may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding.

Credit Card Volume and Dollar Value

Source: Triennial Federal Reserve Payments Studies
Credit Card Holders and Number of Cards1
Type of Card
2002
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
Cardholders
(Mil)
Cards
(Mil)
Cardholders
(Mil)
Cards
(Mil)
Cardholders
(Mil)
Cards
(Mil)
Cardholders
(Mil)
Cards
(Mil)
Cardholders
(Mil)
Cards
(Mil)
Cardholders
(Mil)
Cards
(Mil)
Total
163
1,446
160
1,012
166
1,024
172
1,047
176
1,015
178
1,041
Visa
95
258
124
245
104
254
108
281
118
281
124
311
MasterCard
96
267
78
178
79
178
81
180
87
304
91
200
Discover/Amex
64
90
81
114
84
117
81
107
83
110
78
99
Store
116
547
98
335
100
335
103
344
105
360
108
381
Oil Company
75
93
29
34
29
33
28
33
28
33
27
32
Source: The Nilson Report, a twice-monthly newsletter based in Carpinteria, CA (used with permission)
1 Cardholders may hold more than one brand or type of card.
2Includes Universal Air Travel Plan (UATP), phone cards, automobile rental, and miscellaneous cards; credit card purchase volume excludes phone cards.

Number of Credit Cards and Cardholders

Source: The Nilson Report, a twice-monthly newsletter based in Carpinteria, CA (used with permission)
Credit Card Interest Rates

The data used to describe credit card interest rates and the rates of return to credit card banks come from the “Profitability of Credit Card Operations of Depository Institutions” report provided by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. This report is transmitted to the Congress annually and is based mainly on the Call Report, the Quarterly Report of Credit Card Interest Rates, and the Survey of Terms of Credit Card Plans.

Access at https://www.federalreserve.gov/releases/g19/current/default.htm

Rates on Revolving Credit Cards
 
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4
Avg.
2003
12.85%
12.82%
13.11%
12.91%
12.92%
2004
12.41%
12.93%
13.60%
13.92%
13.22%
2005
14.13%
14.81%
14.75%
14.48%
14.54%
2006
14.38%
14.77%
14.67%
15.09%
14.73%
2007
14.64%
14.47%
15.24%
14.35%
14.68%
2008
13.77%
13.51%
13.64%
13.36%
13.57%
2009
13.54%
14.43%
14.90%
14.37%
14.31%
2010
14.67%
14.48%
14.22%
13.67%
14.26%
2011
13.44%
13.06%
13.08%
12.78%
13.09%
2012
13.04%
12.76%
13.21%
12.81%
12.96%
2013
13.01%
12.76%
13.11%
12.89%
12.94%
2014
13.41%
12.74%
13.18%
13.68%
13.19%
2015
13.53%
13.49%
13.93%
13.70%
13.66%
2016
13.51%
13.35%
13.76%
13.61%
13.56%
2017
13.86%
14.00%
14.89%
14.99%
14.44%
Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Quarterly Report of Credit Card Interest Rates

Quarterly Interest Rate on Revolving Cards

Debit Cards

The data used to describe debit cards come from the 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016 Federal Reserve Payments Study, a triennial survey of the payments industry first conducted in 2001. Also used to describe debit cards is data from The Nilson Report, a twice-monthly newsletter from a firm based in Carpinteria, CA. These studies are part of a Federal Reserve System effort to track noncash payments in the United States, and they reflect the efforts of hundreds of organizations across the country. The statistics for the number of cards and cardholders are from The Nilson Report. The values for years prior to 2008 are as reported in the Statistical Abstract of the United States. The more recent values were obtained directly from The Nilson Report.

Access at www.frbservices.org/communications/payment_system_research.html

Debit Card Volume, Value, and Average Value
 
20031
2006
20091
2012
2015
Number
(Bil)
Value
($Bil)
Avg.
Value ($)
Number
(Bil)
Value
($Bil)
Avg.
Value ($)
Number
(Bil)
Value
($Bil)
Avg.
Value ($)
Number
(Bil)
Value
($Bil)
Avg.
Value ($)
Number
(Bil)
Value
($Bil)
Avg.
Value ($)
Total
15.6
$630
$40
25.0
$1,000
$39
37.5
$1,400
$37
47.0
$1,820
$39
51.9
$1,800
$36
Signature
10.3
$400
$39
15.7
$600
$40
23.1
$800
$35
22.2
$650
$29
31.2
$980
$31
PIN
5.3
$200
$38
9.4
$400
$37
14.4
$600
$42
16.9
$690
$41
20.7
$820
$40
Source: Triennial Federal Reserve Payments Studies
Figures may not add up because of rounding.

Debit Card Volume and Dollar Value

Source: Triennial Federal Reserve Payments Studies
Distribution of General-Purpose Debit Card Payments in 2015
 
Number (Bil)
% of Total
Value (Bil)
% of Total
<$5
8.3
13.9%
$20
0.9%
$5.00‒$14.99
18.7
31.4%
$170
7.4%
$15‒$24.99
9.8
16.4%
$190
8.3%
$25+
22.8
38.3%
$1,910
83.4%
Source: 2015 Federal Reserve Payments Study
Debit Card Holders and Number of Cards1
Type of Card
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
Cardholders
(Mil)
Cards
(Mil)
Cardholders
(Mil)
Cards
(Mil)
Cardholders
(Mil)
Cards
(Mil)
Cardholders
(Mil)
Cards
(Mil)
Cardholders
(Mil)
Cards
(Mil)
Total
191
612
194
645
197
697.2
200
719
202
768.3
Visa
160
417
162
431
167
466
168
468
179
511
MasterCard
129
143
133
158
145
170
149
185
142
189
EFT
189
291
191
296
195
302
197
307
200
312
Other
18
18
20
20
25
25
29
29
31
32
Source: The Nilson Report, a twice-monthly newsletter based in Carpinteria, CA (used with permission)
1 Includes general purpose prepaid cards issued by Visa and MasterCard

Number of Debit Cards and Cardholders

Source: The Nilson Report, a twice-monthly newsletter based in Carpinteria, CA (used with permission)
Includes general purpose prepaid cards issued by Visa and MasterCard.

Prepaid Cards

The data used to describe prepaid cards come from the Triennial Federal Reserve Payments Studies.

Access at https://www.federalreserve.gov/paymentsystems/fr-payments-study.htm

Prepaid Card Volume, Value, and Average Value
 
2006
2009
2012
2015
Number
(Bil)
Value
($Bil)
Avg.
Value ($)
Number
(Bil)
Value
($Bil)
Avg.
Value ($)
Number
(Bil)
Value
($Bil)
Avg.
Value ($)
Number
(Bil)
Value
($Bil)
Avg.
Value ($)
Total
3.3
$80
$23
5.9
$140
$24
9.2
$200
$22
9.9
$270
$27
Private Label
1.9
$30
$18
4.6
$100
$22
6.1
$120
$20
3.6
$70
$20
General Purpose
0.3
$10
$41
1.3
$40
$31
3.1
$100
$34
3.7
$120
$34
EBT
1.1
$30
$27
2.0
$50
$25
2.5
$75
$30
2.6
$80
$29
Source: Triennial Federal Reserve Payment Studies

Prepaid Card Volume and Dollar Value

Source: Triennial Federal Reserve Payment Studies

ACH

The data used to describe automated clearinghouse (ACH) payments come from quarterly statistical reports published publicly by NACHA, the Electronic Payments Association, a not-for-profit organization that oversees the ACH network. NACHA’s quarterly reports publish the breakdown of ACH transactions from the previous quarter and track growth. 

Access at www.nacha.org/c/ACHntwkstats.cfm 

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ACH Transactions and Dollar Value (not including “on-us” transactions)
(Mil)
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
Q1:17
Q2:17
Q3:17
CIE1
133
127
119
138
156
168
176
168
162
162
40
40
39
PPD Debits2
2,611
2,741
2,770
2,833
2,933
3,080
3,232
3,418
3,564
3,724
959
970
962
PPD Credits3
4,021
4,333
4,545
4,710
4,879
5,143
5,420
5,615
5,819
6,115
1,654
1,616
1,569
TEL4
335
347
344
354
367
349
378
411
465
505
136
133
134
WEB5
1,737
2,078
2,280
2,449
2,680
2,953
3,278
3,611
4,122
4,658
1,279
1,265
1,286
Note: Figures for Q1, Q2, and Q3 2017 are not annualized.
Source: NACHA, the Electronic Payments Association
"On-us" are transactions in which the bank that issues your card is the same as the one that owns the ATM or POS terminal on which you made the transaction.
1 CIE = Customer Initiated Entry: A credit entry is initiated by an individual and is used to pay some sort of obligation.
2 PPD Debits = Prearranged Payments and Deposit Debit Application: This is a transfer of funds into a consumer account at the Receiving Depository Financial Institution.
3 PPD Credits = Prearranged Payments and Deposit Credit Application: Authority is granted by the consumer to companies with billing operations to initiate one-time or periodic charges to his or her account as bills become due.
4 TEL = Telephone Authorized Entry: Oral authorization is obtained solely via the telephone.
5 WEB = Internet Authorized Entry: Authorization is obtained solely via the Internet.

ACH Transactions

Source: NACHA, the Electronic Payments Association
Note: All figures exclude “on-us” transactions
"On-us" are transactions in which the bank that issues your card is the same as the one that owns the ATM or POS terminal on which you made the transaction.

International Comparisons of Cards Issued

The comparative data showing the amount of payment cards issued in various countries comes from a report released by The Bank for International Settlements’ Committee on Payments and Market Infrastructures (CPMI). The report, Statistics on Payment, Clearing and Settlement Systems in the CPMI Countries, is published annually.

Access at https://www.bis.org/cpmi/publ/d172.pdf

Cards issued in the country: number of cards (millions, end of year)
Cards With a Cash Function
(MIL)
Cards With an E-money Function
(MIL)
Country
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
Brazil
335.56
348.19
350.25
349.99
344.84
2.65
3.32
2.67
2.44
1.92
China
3,534.00
4,214.00
4,936.00
5,442.00
6,125.00
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France
92.61
88.18
85.67
80.72
81.77
26.72
23.10
14.20
3.03
2.75
Germany
135.34
137.23
144.28
147.29
149.50
97.99
98.96
95.56
91.91
86.11
India
351.19
414.04
575.03
686.57
802.07
12.44
9.63
17.47
61.36
72.75
Japan
361.45
356.88
337.20
337.28
336.79
200.16
229.67
263.96
302.51
336.00
Mexico
139.49
152.78
163.20
171.35
168.35
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Russia
239.55
248.57
278.50
286.15
315.32
48.05
31.11
50.83
42.25
60.58
Singapore
10.59
10.91
10.74
10.28
10.61
19.82
23.09
29.38
34.71
39.82
United Kingdom
168.99
175.59
178.87
175.63
174.26
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United States
827.40
845.10
869.90
913.30
920.90
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Cards With a Payment Function
(MIL)
of which: cards with a debit function
(MIL)
Country
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
Brazil
446.60
462.93
473.25
480.46
467.26
293.30
301.90
313.20
317.40
318.40
China
3,534.15
4,213.89
4,935.72
5,442.31
6124.64
3,203.05
3,823.10
4,480.62
5,010.11
5,659.60
France
82.31
82.22
81.04
77.69
78.87
80.11
80.08
55.27
50.24
50.34
Germany
133.19
133.85
134.61
139.25
142.29
105.59
105.17
103.35
106.10
108.62
India
351.19
414.04
575.03
686.57
802.07
331.20
394.42
553.45
661.54
771.65
Japan
676.79
685.22
677.90
687.00
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417.00
418.00
419.00
421.00
422.00
Mexico
139.49
152.78
163.19
171.35
168.35
114.12
126.90
134.64
141.71
137.13
Russia
191.50
217.46
227.67
243.91
254.74
169.01
188.27
195.90
214.44
224.59
Singapore
19.93
20.47
20.45
19.81
19.87
10.59
10.91
10.74
10.28
10.61
United Kingdom
147.32
153.31
154.74
157.78
158.19
88.55
95.69
95.66
98.80
99.63
United States
1196.40
1213.40
1246.70
1305.40
1334.10
290.80
296.00
301.60
307.30
311.50
Cards With a Credit Function
(MIL)
Country
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
Brazil
153.25
161.00
160.03
163.10
148.87
China
331.10
390.79
455.10
432.21
465.03
France
26.84
19.61
24.92
19.90
19.69
Germany
3.68
3.90
4.39
4.90
5.68
India
19.55
19.18
21.11
24.51
29.84
Japan
259.79
267.22
258.90
266.00
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25.37
25.89
28.55
29.64
31.23
Russia
22.48
29.19
31.76
29.46
30.14
Singapore
9.35
9.56
9.71
9.54
9.26
United Kingdom
56.44
55.36
56.93
58.97
58.56
United States
905.60
917.40
945.10
998.10
1,022.60
Source: Bank of International Settlements Committee on Payments and Market Infrastructures (CPMI)
Notes:
E-money is described by the CPMI as stored value or prepaid products in which a record of the funds or value available to the consumer is stored on a device in the consumer's possession.
Converted at yearly average exchange rates.
Sum or average excluding those countries for which data are not available.
For credit transfers, data for France (prior to 2005) and the United Kingdom include interbank transactions.
Since the value of these transactions is relatively large, cross-country comparison should be treated with caution.
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Adoption of Payments by Households

The data used to describe the adoption of payments by households come from tables in an article by Loretta Mester published in the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia’s Business Review and updated by the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland for 2013. These tables are based on the Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF) as well as the author's calculations. The SCF is a triennial survey of the balance sheet, pension, income, and other demographic characteristics of U.S. families. The survey also gathers information on the use of financial institutions.

Access at

Adoption of Payments by Households (%)
 
1995
1998
2001
2004
2007
2010
2013
ATM
62.5
67.4
69.8
74.4
79.7
83.4
87.0
Debit Card
17.6
33.8
47.0
59.3
67.0
78.4
80.3
Direct Deposit
46.7
60.5
67.3
71.2
74.9
75.9
82.6
Automatic Bill Paying
21.8
36.0
40.3
47.4
45.5
48.3
53.4
Note: The percentages reported are based on the population-weighted figures using the revised Kennickell-Woodburn consistent weights for each year. (For further discussion, see the Survey of Consumer Finances codebooks at http://www.federalreserve.gov/econresdata/scf/scfindex.htm.) External Link This exhibit reports percentages for all households.
1 The questions on ATMs and smart cards asked whether any member of the household had an ATM card or a smart card, not whether the member used it. The other questions asked about usage. The question on smart cards was dropped after the 2001 survey.

Adoption of Payments by Households

Survey of Consumer Payment and Choice

As described on its website, the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston publishes the Survey of Consumer Payment Choice (SCPC), which develops comprehensive, publicly available data on consumer payment behavior. The SCPC is a nationally representative survey of consumer payment behavior developed by the Consumer Payments Research Center of the Boston Fed and implemented by the RAND Corporation with its American Life Panel. The primary purpose of the SCPC is to publish and document the aggregate statistics obtained from the data to help researchers learn how consumers choose among payment instruments, including cash. The report contains detailed tables providing a view of consumers' behavior regarding paper instruments and payment cards as well as electronic instruments. The data are based on a half-hour, Internet-based survey administered by the RAND Corporation to a sample of U.S. consumers drawn from its American Life Panel.

Access at http://www.bostonfed.org/economic/cprc/scpc/