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Monday, September 22, 2014

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Intersections: Fall 2006

“Money in Motion” Exhibit Offers a Learning Experience for Students of All Ages

With 16 exhibit stations and six lessons to focus student learning, the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia’s “Money in Motion” exhibit offers teachers, students, and the general public an interactive venue through which they can learn more about money, banking, and the Federal Reserve System. Just steps from the National Constitution Center, Independence Hall, and the Liberty Bell, the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia is conveniently located to make it one of the stops on any class visit to Independence Mall.

Philadelphia, the home to the first and the second Bank of the United States, was the center of American banking and finance through much of the nation’s formative years. That’s one of the reasons the Philadelphia Fed is eager to teach students, teachers, and the general public about our nation’s financial history through the “Money in Motion” exhibit.

The following represents only a little bit of what students can learn, see, and do during a visit to the exhibit:

  • Trace changes in our currency from the early 1600s to today, view money from the original 13 colonies, and examine a rare $100,000 bill.
  • Learn about the Fed’s role in maintaining national financial stability, especially in the days following 9-11-01.
  • Explore in-depth our country’s monetary policy over the past five decades and learn which economic indicators the Fed monitors to forecast the economic future.
  • Marvel at a 25-foot tower of shredded Federal Reserve notes totaling $100 million and examine a currency cart representing $1.35 million in $5 bills.
  • Delve into the world of payment and debit cards in the electronic age.

Read more in this issue of Intersections about the “Money and Motion” exhibit, the six lessons designed by economic education specialists to focus student learning in the exhibit, and how to visit the exhibit with your students.

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